3. Nutritional Assessment
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Obtain health history:
Chief complaints Medical and family health history Current medications and supplements Routine activity levels Eating habits and recent meals
Do general inspection Assess key body systems – skin, hair and nails; nose, throat and neck; neurologic, cardio, respiratory, GI, renal and muscle systems Obtain anthropometric measurements – height, weight, body mass index and circumference (midarm and midarm muscle) and skin-fold thickness Evaluate lab tests:  Albumin – decreased levels indicate protein deficiency, liver or renal disease, heart failure, surgery, infection, or cancer Hemoglobin – decreased values indicate iron deficiency anemia, over- hydration, or excessive blood loss Hematocrit – decreased levels indicate anemia; increased values suggest dehydration Transferrin – reflect protein stores
Nitrogen – intake and output should be equal Triglycerides – reflect lipid stores Cholesterol – high levels increase risk of coronary artery diseases Abnormal findings: Weight loss – due to decreased food intake, decreased food absorption, increased metabolic requirements or a combination of these. Weight gain – occurs when ingested calories exceed body requirements for energy, causing increased adipose tissue storage Anorexia – is a lack of appetite despite a physiological need for food Muscle wasting – happens when muscle fibers lose bulk and length, causing a visible loss of muscle size and contour
Perform physical assessment:
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Chief complaints Medical and family health history Current medications and supplements Routine activity levels Eating habits and recent meals
Do general inspection Assess key body systems – skin, hair and nails; nose, throat and neck; neurologic, cardio, respiratory, GI, renal and muscle systems Obtain anthropometric measurements – height, weight, body mass index and circumference (midarm and midarm muscle) and skin-fold thickness Evaluate lab tests:  Albumin – decreased levels indicate protein deficiency, liver or renal disease, heart failure, surgery, infection, or cancer Hemoglobin – decreased values indicate iron deficiency anemia, over-hydration, or excessive blood loss Hematocrit – decreased levels indicate anemia; increased values suggest dehydration Transferrin – reflect protein stores
Nitrogen – intake and output should be equal Triglycerides – reflect lipid stores Cholesterol – high levels increase risk of coronary artery diseases Abnormal findings: Weight loss – due to decreased food intake, decreased food absorption, increased metabolic requirements or a combination of these. Weight gain – occurs when ingested calories exceed body requirements for energy, causing increased adipose tissue storage Anorexia – is a lack of appetite despite a physiological need for food Muscle wasting – happens when muscle fibers lose bulk and length, causing a visible loss of muscle size and contour
Obtain health history:
Perform physical assessment:
3. Nutritional Assessment
Click to go to previous page Click to go to Home page Click to go to next page
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Click to go to Home page Click to go to previous page Click to go to next page
3. Nutritional Assessment
Click to go to next page Click to go to previous page Click to go to Home page
NEXT
HOME
PREVIOUS
Obtain health history:
Chief complaints Medical and family health history Current medications and supplements Routine activity levels Eating habits and recent meals
Perform physical assessment:
Do general inspection Assess key body systems – skin, hair and nails; nose, throat and neck; neurologic, cardio, respiratory, GI, renal and muscle systems Obtain anthropometric measurements – height, weight, body mass index and circumference (midarm and midarm muscle) and skin-fold thickness Evaluate lab tests:  Albumin – decreased levels indicate protein deficiency, liver or renal disease, heart failure, surgery, infection, or cancer Hemoglobin – decreased values indicate iron deficiency anemia, over-hydration, or excessive blood loss Hematocrit – decreased levels indicate anemia; increased values suggest dehydration Transferrin – reflect protein stores
Nitrogen – intake and output should be equal Triglycerides – reflect lipid stores Cholesterol – high levels increase risk of coronary artery diseases Abnormal findings: Weight loss – due to decreased food intake, decreased food absorption, increased metabolic requirements or a combination of these. Weight gain – occurs when ingested calories exceed body requirements for energy, causing increased adipose tissue storage Anorexia – is a lack of appetite despite a physiological need for food Muscle wasting – happens when muscle fibers lose bulk and length, causing a visible loss of muscle size and contour
Click to go to next page Click to go to previous page Click to go to Home page
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